Why the temple fades is the most underrated Barber technique you should know


Your body is a temple, for sure. But that’s your head. Or at least it has them, so you can make the most of them by taping the latest and greatest tonal tricks.

The temple bleaching is the youngest in a long line of modern barbering techniques that he has taken up residence on heads. It is an ideal, low-risk hair maneuver and has a significantly less noticeable appearance than other, better-established haircuts. Nonetheless, this subtle element can add a contemporary touch to a variety of hairstyles.

All the men painting the temple fade away something worth noting in the mental Rolodex when it comes to visiting your barber. Here’s what you need to take with you:

What is a temple ban?

You do not have to be Sherlock Holmes to figure out what the temple might look like. The hint is in the name. “Temple fading is a very specific fading, with only the temple area on both sides and the neck area on the back of the head hidden below the sides,” explains Dan Glass, an elderly hairdresser in Murdock, London. “This is usually on a grade below a grade two.”

The subtlety of the temple fading means it can be used to accompany a wide range of men’s haircuts. “From the choppy look to a slick-back or little pompadour – it’s adaptable enough to use with any trim,” adds Joth Davies, owner of Savills Barber.

Traditionally, these classic cuts are worn with a short back and sides. Adding a temple to the mix can add a modern touch to any style. It’s the perfect choice if you want to rock # throwback hair without looking like you’ve just walked out of the Delorean.

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How was the temple faded?

So when was this understated styling detail so big? Well, it was not really. With all its pluses, the Temple Fade is still a relatively unknown barber flex and often loses in its more popular options, such as drop fade, taper fade or low fade.

The only real mainstream attention Temple Fade received when it was worn by Jersey Shore DJ Pauly D as part of his brand “Blowout” hairstyle. Granted, that was not the kind of celebrity confirmation that would probably lure stylish men into their local barbershops, but it was enough to gain some recognition for this misunderstood cut.

From then on, the blowout style became more popular, especially among guys with afro hair. However, this resulted in the temple fading and typing only for this hair type. But that’s something that is starting to change now when people realize the versatility it can offer.

Will it work for me?

Before you feel comfortable in the barber chair, you must consider whether a temple should fade or not the right one for you. “A Temple Fade is a perfect crossfade option for those who are new to this kind of look and want to be careful – that is, not having a complete crossfade,” says Davies.

It’s also worth considering whether this type of haircut adapts to your face shape. The fade of the temple is useful to reduce the weight on the sides of the head, making it a solid option for those with round or square faces who want to trim things closely to the sides while having the opportunity to do something longer to wear

Temple fade styles and how to get them

Temple Fade + Short Crop

Short-cut haircuts have experienced an unprecedented revival in recent years. This is largely due to Cillian Murphy and his band Brummie Brothers on Peaky Blinders . However, the harsh look of the undercut that is commonly worn with this style can discourage some men from doing so. Here comes the temple to a halt.

“The characteristic feature of this haircut would be a classic, forward-looking plant with a small extra edge,” explains Glass. “The temple bleaching helps turn a harvest from the simple short butt and sides you had in school into a modern classic. This is particularly appropriate in view of the renaissance of the sportswear styles of the 90s. ”

When visiting the barber, it is important to emphasize that you want to fade a temple rather than the traditional high fade or disconnected undercut. “It’s also important to distinguish between the preferred length on the sides (eg # 2) and the crossfade (eg # 0 / 0.5 / skin),” adds Glass.

When it comes to styling, it could not be easier. “Just dry your hair with a towel, apply it with a matte paste and arrange it as chaotically or structured as you want.”

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Temple Fade + Pompadour

The Pompadour is a cool follicular relapse, but the inclusion of a strap adds the finishing touch, helping to redefine a retro classic into a timeless men’s hairstyle.

“It looks great with a long-haired pompadour, where the sides are cut with scissors for an inch long, or on a pomp where the sides and back were cut to a grade two, three, or even four,” says Glass.

“[The sides] can either fade into your beard or through the end of your sideburns. Like a harvest, specify the shortest length to which you would apply the fade. ”

Of course, one should remember that the pompadour haircut requires a fair amount of styling. “Generously apply a sea salt spray before you blow-dry the sides diagonally to the crown and build up a significant volume through the fringes.” Then finish with a little pomade, stroke the hair up to the neck and comb back the fringe it sits neatly on top.

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Temple fade + Short Afro

A temple fading with a short afro makes for a great low-key alternative to the bolder blow-out style. It’s also useful to cut the sides of the face down if your cheeks are a bit too round to get full.

“The temple fades between the top of the ear and the recession area around the hairline,” explains Tom Chapman, founder of the Lions Barber Collective and ambassador of the foster brand, Bluebeards Revenge. “In the meantime, the Afro is usually kept close to the scalp, resulting in an aesthetically pleasing silhouette of form and structure.”

Chapman advises your hairdresser to make a skin rejuvenation or to fade the hair up in front of both ears with a clean line. “A picture is always best to show your hairdresser that your ‘shorthair’ is not your hairdresser’s short hairstyle.”

Keep in mind that the shorter the fade, the more often it needs to look sharp and fresh.

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Temple fade + Smooth back

If you are looking for a style that looks smart and fits together with minimal effort, then this “returned” could be just what you’re after.

“Ask your barber to include the fade to the temple area in front of the ear,” says Chapman. “Then it is mixed in the top and back of the hair. Sometimes there may be a small break or an overhang from the extra length in the edge area. Mix it backwards and let enough length through the top end to smooth it with decreasing length in the neck.

If all this sounds a bit confusing, go back to the old faithful trick of taking a picture with you. “Create a folder on your phone with different angles, and get the haircut you want,” he adds.

For styling, grab a foundation product such as salt spray or volume powder and apply it to wet hair – bring it back and into shape. “Finish with a matte paste to make sure you look good until you visit your hairdresser in about four weeks.”

Why the temple fades is the most underrated Barber technique you should know underrated temple technique should fades barber

Why the temple fades is the most underrated Barber technique you should know underrated temple technique should fades barber


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